North America (Outside Georgia and Indiana)

Belated July 4th


Hats off to America! And where better to celebrate its birthday than the nation’s oldest city? Spoiler alert, though– if you want to watch the fireworks in St. Augustine from the Villano Bridge, they don’t actually start until it’s dark! Either way, we had a wonderful time together waiting for the fireworks, with undoubtedly the best spots on the bridge (3 hours early will do it for you). We even got a little appetizer to the display when a ratchet family decided it would be prudent and wise to burn firecrackers beside us. The picture looks more magical than it was. Afterwards we came back and celebrated the Georgia way with some good ol’ peach shortcake. As a brief aside- if your peach does not have fuzz on it, it is not a real peach. Full stop. You are eating a second-rate, castoff plum mutation (steps off soapbox).

How did you celebrate your Fourth?


Outfit Details:
Hat: Vintage
Dress: French Connection
Belt: Gap
Shoes: Bally
Purse: Kate Spade


Ay Jax

Today, I thought I would share two of my favorite places to eat in Jacksonville, Florida with you. I spent all last summer working there, so I’m getting kind of nostalgic, and had to visit my favorites when I went back to St. Augustine last week.

  1. Chamblin’s Uptown


The socialite cousin of Chamblin’s Bookmine, this bookstore-cum-coffee shop-makeshift lunch destination is simultaneously one of the most bustling and calm in the city. Located at 215 N. Laura street right on the city square, smack in the middle of downtown Jacksonville, it’s an oasis of art, literature, and oversize cookies at your fingertips. Best of all, if you forget your book, they have plenty to choose from, and a liberal coffee selection on the cafe side. IMG_4194

2. Bistro Aix


The closest Jacksonville gets to France, Bistro Aix has the smell and warmth of a boulangerie and the wine menu of fine Parisian dining. Complete with a wood fired oven and salmon smoked in-house, pizzas the likes of the one below come topped with caviar at the most affordable price this side of San Marco. Adjoined is Bar X, where you can soak in fashionably low Deco lighting with a Death in the Afternoon even Hemingway would approve of. Afterwards? It’s off to the nearby shops and boutiques lining San Marco’s beautiful neighborhood as the sea’s waves peak at you, just a block away. IMG_3799

Outfit Details:
Blazer: Zara
Pants: Givenchy
Shoes: H&M
Bag: Kate Spade

Do you Believe in Magic?


Greetings from Harry Potter World! In anticipation of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, I’ve incorporated a bit of a 1920’s flare. The costumes in the trailer are perfection, don’t you think?


Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 2.49.15 PM

After a few roller coasters, I took the Hogwarts Express from Hogsmeade over to Diagon Alley for lunch. Shortly following was a delicious steak pie and too much butterbeer! For those cream soda lovers out there- butterbeer is heaven.



Pro-tip: If you know you are going to spend a certain amount of money in the park, you can go to the Gringott’s Money Exchange for real Gringott’s bank notes (or a money voucher you can use anytime in the park). If you use the note for less than it’s value, you get muggle change. But you have to watch out for this guy:


Outfit Details:
Shirt: Marni
Skirt: New Look
Kimono: Boutique Find
Shoes: Primark
Bag: Kate Spade
Glasses: Isaac Mizrahi


Summer of Discovery

IMG_4404After about a year hiatus, I’ve come back! Some of the pictures that I will be sharing are old, but I think these in particular capture how I feel about this summer. Three weeks ago, I graduated from law school. With that accomplished, I feel like the world is mine again. Even with everyday bar prep, I cannot summon the anxiety or stress to feel worried. The sun is radiant right now in South Bend, and I feel like everyday is a new opportunity to explore what’s out there. For instance, the Lightner Museum.

Charles Lighter acquired the front half of the Alcazar Hotel (described with other St. Augustine history here) as a showroom for his personal collection in the 1940s. Reading between the lines, it looks like Lightener was rich during the Depression and bought up the old money possessions of hapless Northerners before carpetbagging down to St. Augustine and buying the closed Alcazar. He also managed to amass a beautiful group of Tiffany glass windows (Louis Tiffany actually started his company with the help of Flagler in order to outfit the windows of the Ponce de Leon, now Flagler University). Even though fashion blogs usually fixate around showing clothes, I couldn’t help but choose darkness of the light seeping through the panes over a clear shot of the fabric of my jeans. There’s a “light at the end of the tunnel,” and sometimes it’s just breathtaking. DSC_0804DSC_0778DSC_0753

Outfit: Hat: Ralph Lauren | Scarf in hair (questionable decision in hindsight): Liberty London | Tunic: Elizabeth and James | Jacket: Rag & Bone | Purse: Rebecca Minkoff (laptop case)DSC_0780

The Collection


Here are a few bits of the actual collection that I thought were worth note: DSC_0795DSC_0808This is the most extensive toaster collectionIMG_4413IMG_4408

Beatific Vibes

I’m rounding out the last day of pictures o my San Francisco escapade, and the time has come for over-indulgence. Since there is no hope of affording rent there anytime soon (if you are unsure, this quiz is sure to get you down), I had to pack as many of the Victorian-gone-groovy vibes. This included a stop to the epic City Lights Bookstore, my choice historical book source after the Library of Alexandria, started by none other than Lawrence Ferlinghetti (of Beat fame) and possibly most famous for publishing and selling Howl in the 1950s (despite its status as a banned book).



Word to the wise: horizontal stripes after brunch are not picture perfect.


Coit Tower


San Francisco Harbor- Doesn’t this just look like a beacon promising fresh new hope for the future?


You didn’t realize another feet picture was just what you needed, did you?


This might be my favorite building in San Francisco. A living reminder of the Bohemia in the midst of business giants.


Outfit Details: Hat: Vintage | Shirt: Primark | Skirt: Next | Flats: Jeffrey Campbell

April is poetry month, and as Easter just passed, I’ll share my favorite Ferlinghetti poem here. I couldn’t include the zaniness of the original formatting, so it’s worth looking up for a second look if you like it.

Sometime During Eternity
By: Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Sometime during eternity
some guys show up
and one of them
who shows up real late
is a kind of carpenter
from some square-type place
like Galilee
and he starts wailing
and claiming he is hep
to who made heaven
and earth
and that the cat
who really laid it on us
is his Dad

And moreover
he adds
It’s all writ down
on some scroll-type parchments
which some henchmen
leave lying around the Dead Sea somewheres
a long time ago
and which you won’t even find
for a coupla thousand years or so
or at least for
ninteen hundred and fortyseven
of them
to be exact
and even then
nobody really believes them
or me
for that matter

You’re hot
they tell him

And they cool him

They stretch him on the Tree to cool
And everybody after that
is always making models
of this Tree
with Him hung up
and always crooning His name
and calling Him to come down
and sit in
on their combo
as if he is THE king cat
who’s got to blow
or they can’t quite make it

Only he don’t come down
from His Tree

Him just hang there
on His Tree
looking real Petered out
and real cool
and also
according to a roundup
of late world news
from the usual unreliable sources
real dead

In a Jingle Jangle Morning


The vibe of today’s post was inspired in part by Foxygen’s song entitled San Francisco on their album We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic. However, true to form, rather than looking much like the girl in the video, I think I’m more a reflection of the male singer. Besides that, I hoped to channel the great era that brought the musical revolution which erupted from Haight Ashbury in the 60s. I might be more like Fred from Scooby Doo, but luckily, 70s in coming in, right?

I spent all marveling walking from Chinatown over to Haight Ashbury and Golden Park, marveling over the quaint Victorian houses along the way. At one point, I found a park with a wonderful view, shown below. I was in awe of the fortune of my find. Little did I know, I had only stumbled onto the typical tourist path and was taking pictures of none other than the Painted Ladies, a la Full House fame. Nevertheless, it was still a nice surprise. My blisters the next day were not.




IMG_2346Outfit Details: Scarf:Baar and Beards | Vest: Talbots | Fringe Leotard: H&M (thanks LadyBirdLikes– she has awesome instagram sales where you can grab a variety of fantastic/ funky gems) | Jeans: Gap | Socks: Primark | Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell

Lombard Street



Given the nature of the street, this post is going to make a few winding digressions that reflected my morning walk through the area towards Lombard Street and eventually Fisherman’s Wharf:

1. The chocolate motherland. This was both so exciting and totally jarring. Downtown Disney has a matching structure, which I did not realize paid homage to this megalith. Thus, it was like going home getting a sea salt caramel hot chocolate 1,000 miles away, but realizing that Disney and Ghiradelli’s love child was no more than just that, a child, of Ghirardelli Square was a big surprise.


2. With the on-going housing crisis in San Francisco, now is probably not the time to get choosy, but when I saw this place, shadowed by a noble birch (haha I have no idea what kind of tree it is), a modern cousin (and I would argue first cousin) of the tree house tucked at the top of hill. In it I could not help but see my future castle, a dominion unmatched! Too bad I have student loans and an unpaid internship…


3. An outfit reflection: beret in, socks out. Berets have been on the Vogue radar for a bit (trumping beanies). What aren’t on the radar are orthopedic shoes, so I would seriously suggest not wearing off-white socks with off-white platform shoes (what was I thinking). Also, I have never really done a scarf with strapless before, but when tied like a girl scout kerchief, it kind of looks like straps and it can make for a cool silhouette.

Outfit Details: Beret: vintage | Scarf: Liberty London | Top: Anthropologie | Gloves: Vintage | Capris: The Row | Socks: Primark| Shoes: Zara Trafaluc


My April Eccentric Glamour link-up is open through the 4th here, please drop by and add your link!


Eccentric Glamour: Live From San Francisco!

Welcome to the Eccentric Glamour link-up, a forum specially designed to get together and showcase forgotten, yet fabulous articles in our closets! I’m excited to bring you these vintage-inspired shots from Sutro Baths (and the surrounding park in San Francisco). The views from the hike are pretty stunning, so I’ll let them speak for themself… kind of like my outfit. 😉


Outfit Details: Hat: Vintage | Dress: Dear Creatures | Gloves: Vintage | Shoes: Zara TrafalucDSC_0107

Sutro Baths (pictured in the background below) have an interesting, if slightly tragic history (after the collapse of a specialized railroad line-now hiking trail), which you can read more about here. But trust me, they were all the rage in the late 19th century. I was kind of obsessed with the fairy tale splendor of the surrounding trees…




Don’t Forget!

  1. If you’d like to regularly contribute, please take a moment to follow my blog (links can be found on the sidebar).
  2. Please confine posts to those which showcase some spectacular article of clothing. It doesn’t have to be crazy, but just a bit in line with our theme of “Eccentric Glamour” (although choosing one half or the other of that mantra will also suffice). However, if you choose to post, please provide a link back to the Eccentric Glamour link-up somewhere in your post.
  3. Try to check out a few other bloggers posts to build inspiration and community!

Shared to Style Crone’s Hat Attack Link-up!


California Here I Come: Napa

I’m excited to show you some of the pictures from my California adventure! Some of you may have noticed my three week hiatus, a period over which I was decidedly not learning how to photoshop (so sorry for that attempt yesterday, but it got the point across with a little overzealous sponging). While I had the best intentions of keeping up the blog over Spring Break, I found myself wandering around San Francisco and working on short stories instead, and I couldn’t help but let the mood take me. However, amidst my aesthetic stupor I managed to squeeze in a few field trips about which I couldn’t be more excited. Enter Napa. 




One of my best friends from high school just moved out to the area to do “science” at a winery. It seems only natural if one travels 500 miles across the country to dial up everyone in the immediate vicinity, so entirely because of the pressing weight of the social duties falling upon me, I called him to set up a wine tasting together. We had a wonderful day, punctuating tastings with a cute little French patisserie where I had a delicious sea salt caramel macaroon (and could really call myself bourgeoisie). It also let me embrace some Edgar Allen Poe American Romanticism, so here’s my Mysterious Macabre Villainess, naturally standing in a wine cellar (soon to be the home of a someone buried alive?).



I wanted to look classy, modern, yet understated (don’t want to look like you’re trying at a wine tasting), so I paired  a couple of subdued pinks with ostrich feathers to bring just enough glam. I tried these high tops for a bit of modern nonchalance. We mixed in my first In-and-Out experience for some real casual elegance at the end of the day. I think Taylor deserves a few well-deserved snaps.

DSC_0140Outfit Details: Necklace: Down the Rabbit Hole (my favorite boutique in St. Augustine that sadly closed. You can find them on Fb here) | Top: Marni |  Skirt: Zara | Shoes/Socks: Primark

Wineries Visited: Robert Mondavi and Artesa



The Original Town

Beyond the Fountain of Youth, St. Augustine is a quirky little town that I didn’t feel I was able to adequately expound upon in the last post. While I was there, I read a short biography on Henry Flagler, specifically as it pertained to his St. Augustine hotels. For those of you who’ve heard his name (or maybe haven’t) rather in connection with the prominent liberal arts college in the middle of Old Town or further South, if you’ve visited The Breakers (included on the 1,000 Places to See Before You Die), his story bears repeating, if for no other reason than to understand the development of the Eastern coast of Florida into the vacation spot it is today.

An American self-starter, Flagler was primarily in the grain industry when John D. Rockefeller approached him, asking for a loan on an oil refinery. That investment put Flagler on the ground floor of the partnership that would become Standard Oil. As the company grew, Flagler maintained his seat on the board, but eventually his interests were drawn elsewhere. After a series of trips to the Jacksonville/ St. Augustine area, Flagler hatched a plan to create an “American Riviera.” St. Augustine, with its compendium of historical draws, recreation (to be found on nearby Anastasia Island), and local flavor fit the bill. His plan was hatched, which included building a state-of-the-art luxury hotel in the middle of St. Augustine, which would be connected to New York by way of the Florida East Coast Railway (the amalgamation of a number of local railways Flagler bought to connect to the larger railway systems up North). Thus, the train would drop off pleasure-seekers in his backyard, as long as he could provide accommodation.


Old entrance to the Ponce de Leon Hotel, today Flagler College

This accommodation began with the Ponce de Leon Hotel, an American palace that played host to the likes of  Mark Twain, Babe Ruth, and four presidents. It also inaugurated the tradition of Red Brick (thank you Carrere & Hastings) that is commonly associated with the Spanish Renaissance style of architecture seen throughout Florida today (did anyone say Grand Floridian?). Flagler went on to build the Alcazar Hotel (directly opposite) and acquire the Casa Monica Hotel to round out his St. Augustine holdings. But neither the Depression, nor the course of history was particularly kind to the burgeoning Riviera. Though it enjoyed about 15 years in the lap of luxury, the same elements that drew people to Florida projected them south. St. Augustine, the first stop into Florida, has cold winters by Floridian standards, and Vacation-goers looking to escape the chill, continued onwards to Palm Beach and Miami, leaving St. Augustine in their stead. Luckily, the astute businessman that Flagler was, he expanded with the times, and built hotels down the coast, making him one of the patriarchs of Miami.

Still, his monolithic vision was left in the wake, mausoleums to the pleasure-seekers of yesteryear before the belt-buckling thrift of the depression set in. the Ponce de Leon was converted into Flagler College. The Alcazar (once home to the largest indoor pool in the world) converted into the Cafe Alcazar and hosts the Lightner Collection in its front section. Ironically, the Casa Monica, notoriously working in the red in its day, continues on as the only hotel on the block (but don’t get me started on B and B’s).


Tiffany glass detailing. The Tiffany Glass Company was actually founded in order to provide glass for the Ponce de Leon.

Casa Monica



Detailing on a mirror inside the Casa Monica. It is decorated in the Moorish style.

The Alcazar (today Lightner Museum)



Here is the Cafe Alcazar nestled in the deep end floor of what was once the largest indoor pool in America.

Old Town (After all,  it is the oldest Spanish colony in America.)



View from the Fort.


Huguenot graves, although the sign says that Huguenot meant “not Catholic” rather than the French Huguenots that might come to mind.


DSC_0164 2

National Geographic has named this street in St. Augustine, the “prettiest street in America.” What do you think?


Mission Nombre de Dios was the first Spanish Mission in North America. This year it turns 450 years old!

I’ve left out so much great stuff focusing on the more decadent expansions of industrialism. Not pictures are wonderful bits like the Lions Bridge, St. Augustine Fort, Villa Zordaya, and the iconic Anastasia Island lighthouse. I guess I’ll just have to go back…