fashion 2014

Street Style: Notre Dame + 1 Detroit

 

Go Bold

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Matching backpack and tights ❤

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Caped Crusaders

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Joie, sleek exterior, accessorized with a blood red criminal law textbook.

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Honorary Mention (because your hat be jammin’):

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My Favorite Cardigan

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Christian from Detroit or should I say Blue Steel?

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Mike from Philly,

AND THERE ARE MORE DUCKS ON THE BACK!

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Crazy Legs and Strong Ankles

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This was before I realized I needed a picture of the whole person.. but they are still so cool I had to include them.

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Saloni in the New York Times!

http://blog.maison-boutique.com/saloni-at-maison-celebrating-the-traditional-touch/

Or should I say SALONI? In case you’ve never heard of her, Saloni Lodha is the mastermind behindher titular brand. Born in Mumbai, her clothes are evoke a “playful elegance” admired by the likes of Emma Watson, Michelle Obama, Jennifer Hudson, Alexis Bledel… but lest I give the game away, you can read all about it in her recent New York Times article.

Cheap Designer Label Clothes: What’s not to Like?

Opening February 9th is Target’s newest collaboration: Peter Pillotto for Target. I’ve said before that Peter Pilotto is the future, but this is a groundbreaking collection from a business perspective (for several reasons besides team designers. Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos’, genius). This marks the first time the Peter Pillotto label offers both swimwear and accessories. To celebrate, Target has taken a step in the global direction and is making the collaboration accessible by featuring it Net-a-Porter.

The designs look great — almost like a cross between scuba gear, Jackson Pollock, and the office. No doubt come February, I will find myself perusing Target’s aisles, silently salivating as the sweet smell of design meets affordability.

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But before I get overwhelmed by the ever-beckoning lure of the label, I have to ask myself and my readers. Why do we like these collaborations? Do we actually like them? Every so often with mixed success, Target, H&M, or Kohl’s tantalizes us with these  oh-so classy looking displays; you get to the store, pulse racing, thinking, “Ah! The joy of having nice clothes made by someone who understands!” Then you touch the fabric, and in a moment of dizzy realization and confusion, it’s just glorified polyester with more thought exerted on it. But I go. every. time. And every time, I ask myself, why would I pay $40 for a white shirt from Target?

Am I being too snobby? Looking back at past Target collaborations, they are undoubtedly cool. Even celebrities wear them!

Jason Wu:

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In real life:012712-jason-wu-target-launch-600

And Philip Lim:

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So essentially, by buying the collaborated label, you sacrifice fabric and tailoring, leaving yourself with design. Is that a worthwhile trade, or am I better off to save up my money and thrift like mad? Then again, maybe my expectations are too high. No one is walking out of Target, fanning their fingers together saying, “YES! Runway gold!” Still, if we know that we aren’t really getting designer, why are we buying for designer? The Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine posited in her article Pilotto for the People that the reason to shop these collaborations is to cash in on the prints (making Pilotto the perfect designer). Now we get Peter Pilotto prints without the Peter Pilotto price tag… I don’t know, but that bathing suit is sure calling my name.

It’s Not Betty White?

I have to confess. As a blogger, I’m an absolutely terrible news outlet. When I come across a new, exciting piece of information, ripe for posting, I immediately make sure to do nothing about it. I nod to myself, “Wow, that’s great. People need to know about this.” I spend a week thinking about it, arguing that I’m trying to organize the information, and wade through all my homework before I take the time to blog. For these reasons, it may come as no surprise to some of you that a few weeks ago, Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen’s fashion line, The Row, published their Fall 2014 lookbook. Ordinarily at this time of year, that would be no surprise and merely signal that the company hadn’t gone under in the past three months. However, this time, making a statement beyond its delicious fabrics and utilitarian designs, The Row stunned fashion followers when they employed the modeling talents a famous 60-something: Linda Rodin. Ursula Wallis, 39, and Esther de Jong (whose agency wouldn’t release her age) also modeled for the collection. None of these ladies are strangers to the fashion scene, let alone the runway (Wallis was in Prada’s 2013 Fall show). Linda Rodin, in particular, has a resume that begins with her modeling alongside Twiggy in the 1960s, going on to edit Harper’s Bazaar, and spans to her skincare and perfume line, Rodin Olio Lusso, today.

Ursula Wallis:

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Esther de Jong Comparison:

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Now, I don’t know about you, but however fabulous each of these ladies may be, until seeing The Row’s lookbook, I had never heard of any of them. Maybe I’m just too young, but I don’t think that’s the answer. To be honest, when it comes to older women in the limelight, few come to mind. Except one. How could anyone overlook Betty White?

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Admittedly, I am also partial to the Dames Julie and Maggie.

But for whatever reason in my mind, Betty White seems like the sole vocal representative of older women in entertainment (yes, I know she’s not in fashion). While I know this is an exaggeration, I would be interested to see what others think of when they think of older women in entertainment/ fashion. I’m fascinated by The Row’s step in this direction, and only want to know why aren’t others already diversifying the ages of their models? I can think of three reasons (let me know your thoughts!):

1. I would think that the main concern of using older models is that you might lose a younger consumer audience (do they even have money anyway?).

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2. Advertising 101: Sex sells. While we aren’t selling sex to women per se when they are looking at others, the people we see modeling on any other runway are what we WANT to look like. There’s the lust to look sexy like them and so we buy the product. While I am not proposing that 60-year-olds are not or cannot be sexy, I just think that fewer 20-year-olds think “sexy” when they see an older woman.

Whether or not those are apt reasons, I’ll be interested to see how The Row does financially this Fall. Furthermore, I think it’s refreshing to see a high fashion line channel a look other than an exotic infanta, rolling in newfound libido (which explains why none of them have grown breasts yet — now I’m just ranting irrationally). The point is, old women are fabulous, and I think that we forget that because we don’t see them in that station. Men get their leather libraries and persian slippers, but where are our grandmothers? I only see Betty.

Quite Right.

Quite Right.

As I’ve mentioned before, I love Ari Seth Cohen’s blog, Advanced Style because he photos breathtaking women who aren’t juggling college, a fixie, and a skinny vanilla latte. I like women with businesses, grandchildren, and the perm you never thought to try. It’s not that I don’t like the first group, rather, it’s like someone’s put too much water in my apple juice, the media has diluted their poignance. Why does high fashion, the most creative industry in the market, pander to the same tired age group? I love Karlie Kloss just as much as the next girl, but I’d like to see more marketing where in this direction.

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I’ll help the practice along with one of the most beautiful women I know.

For more information on other older models still working out there, check out this Huffington Post article.

DIY: Pretty in Pink Edition

A few days ago I was at the thrift store and came across this little beauty:

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The lace was impeccable! The cloth was fully lined, of good quality, and no buttons were chipped or missing (it buttons up the back). Though at first glance, it seemed like a styleless rag,  I decided to invest two whole dollars to embark on an experiment of mammoth proportions.

  • Eighties-tastic Thrift Store Find: $2.00
  • Brand: Watters and Watters
  • Problems: Shoulder Pads and Crazy Scalloped Sleeves.

Step 1: Seam Rip.

With a mere seam-ripper and 30 minutes, I was able to remove the sleeves and the shoulder pads. Because the sleeves had several layers of stitching, it took a while, but also left me with a natural fold to hem the sleeves when I was done.

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Step 2: Eliminate Damage

I don’t have a sewing machine, so I ended up hand stitching the sides down. I just popped in a movie (Grace Kelly, Bing Crosby, and Frank Sinatra with Louis Armstrong in High Society- I’d recommend it if you like old movies and jazz) and just stitched away. It maybe took 40 minutes? Ta-Dah!

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Step 3: Call Me Molly Ringwold. I’m goin’ to prom y’all, or at least, back to law school.

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Hello Valentino. Ok, maybe thats a stretch. More like this?

Fancy: 8

Function: 7

Funky: 6

Fashion: 8

Alexander McQueen’s “It” Hat: Inspiration 2014

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Sarah Burton’s Spring 2014 collection for Alexander McQueen introduced something to put on your head. But what is it? Hat? Cap? Cloche? Skullcap?  Flashing down the runway in silver and gold, where did this innovation come from?

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“I wanted energy without froth.” Burton claims.

I posit 3 possible inspirations.

1. Blue collar power tool industry inspiration?

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This seems like the most likely option to me based on last year’s beekeeping theme. Is Burton/ McQueen quietly paying homage to  different industries, making statements about there perception while transfusing high and low cultural conceptions?

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2. A modern take on a 1920s cloche? Is this update supposed to be an interpretation of a “new woman” and the more metallic streamlined look supposed to represent strength?

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Burton agreed with this interpretation saying, “They’re sort of 1920s cloche hats.” While this may be true, contrasted with the tribal and militaristic influences of the collection, what started as a cloche seems like decidedly something else.

3. (my personal favorite) Tron?

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Image enough said.

Have any better ideas? Let me know what you think… Feel free to add whether you would ever wear this. I’m still on the fence.

Fashion: 7

Funky: 8

Fancy: 3

Function: 2