Roaring Prohibitions

Today in bar prep, I have been “furiously” reviewing Criminal Procedure. All the terminology stirs the imagination towards gangster movies. “Terry” frisks? Search and Seizures? Warrant based off an anonymous tip? You gotta be kiddin me… I got my rights!

You know the Hollywood schmaltz.

In the fervor of the period, here’s today’s selection from my very own rotating crap game. Don’t ask questions. After all, you know the score, kid.DSC_0569 (2)DSC_0580DSC_0564 (1)

Outfit Details: Cloche: Merona | Scarf: Liberty London | Lipstick: Chanel | Velvet Coat: Vintage | Frock: Theory | Belt: Souvenir from Budapest | Watch: Vintage | Shoes: Vigevano (Fun Fact: Vigevano actually produced the first rubber soled tennis shoes in the 1920s)DSC_0592 (1)DSC_0588 (1)

Now scram (if you know what’s good for ya).

Une Pomme de ma Tête

Isn’t it funny the things that we become attached to? When I look through my room, I have so many things: books, hats, clothes—the list goes on and on. And yet, when  you ask me to point out the things that I would take with me if I had to leave it all behind, it’s the funny, nearly valueless things that mean so much to me. Now I’m not saying I would leave me rings and jewelry PUH-lease. It’s just some of my favorite things are quite unexpected. Take for instance this picture:

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I randomally picked it up one day in a cute shop in Oxford called Arcadia (really a haven for vintage papers of all kinds). I think I probably got it because it was the only old magazine reproduction that was under 10 pounds, and yet, it has brought me so many smiles. One of my friends even referred to it as the “naked girl” picture. But that little French adventurer is more than a sometimes naked girl to me. She’s sort of my spirit animal. Well, the other day I looked at it and found myself caught looking at the white outfit. I couldn’t think if I had any hat that would be anything like hers and more or less gave the idea up. Literally, less than 5 days later, I was browsing an antique warehouse and came upon the on I’m wearing in pictures for 5 dollars. It was fate! I hope you like my interpretation.





Outfit Details: Hat: Thrifted | Shirt: French Connection | Capris: J.M. Collection | Heels: Loft


Silk Romper, Anyone?


As some of you may know who have been following me, I have recently aquired a very strong taste for the indomintable Australian myestery series, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, which I also mentioned as the inspiration for this post, and have been shamelessly sharing screenshots on tumblr here. Well, needless to say, I am intriuged by the series, but it’s a toss up as to whether I am more bewitched by the costuming or the story lines. That is to say, the costumes are that good. Seriously, her be-turbaned, dropwaist, fur lined, silk embroidered flapper chic is everything I want all the time.

Well, in one of the first episodes of the first season, she popped out of her boudoir wearing only a silk slip romper. The screen shot opportunity was limited (as you can tell), but since then I’ve been intent on finding something similar. It seems like the perfect garment: cool and loose against the skin, while still elegantly sensual and effortless. The only problem is that it is requiring a lot of effort. Namely, I can’t find any.

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So far, I’ve only been able to find the one below (now on sale at Anthropologie) as a close second. I’ve perused etsy and found two or three vintage options on etsy, but as could be expected, anything silky and vintage from the 1940s or before is pricing in the 200 dollar range.


Salua Chloe Silk Romper from Anthropologie.

I thought I’d now extend my search to reach out to you. Have any of you seen anything like this under 100? Or is that just an unrealistic dream? Are there any brands (small or large) who do this sort of thing? Please help!




For the second installment of the C-hat-auqua series, it’s getting a little funky with the  lampshade-turned-hat. It really is… something. I have no idea what the correct period for this piece is (anyone want to weigh in?), but it seems appropriate for the excluded flapper. That girl who wasn’t exactly a wallflower, but certainly didn’t have that joie de vivre radiating from her daily existential struggle. I just want yell, “Girl, the reason you don’t fit in is because you have a lampshade on your head. Get a cloche.”


“All the time the flapper is laughing and dancing, there’s a feeling of tragedy underneath. She’s unhappy and disillusioned, and that’s what people sense.”
– Clara Bow

Shared to Hat Attack

Flapper Christmas


Merry Christmas all from the Clothesline! We hope your day is the bees knees, and that you get wonderful gifts from people as lovely as yourself. Personally, I like to make sure my presence is a present, so I took the following sartorial approach. Remember- life is a banquet; don’t be one of the poor suckers starving to death!DSC_0208






DSC_0154   Outfit Details: Dress: Carolyne Barton Night (vintage) | Tights: Primark | Shoes: Rampage (old) | Cloche: a gift! (unbranded) | Poison ring: vintage

Thanks to:
Pictures: Madeline Arnall
Lighting: Harrison Mowell

Gender By Us

Today NPR published a piece entitled, “For These Millennials Gender Norms Have Gone Out of Style.” To get to the point, these days men wear nail polish, women wear suits, and some Urban Outfitter’s employees wear whatever they pull out of the family dryer.

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To me, it comes as no surprise that the author, Lidia Kott, could round up three gender-benders from New York, San Fran, and D.C., respectively. I expect that people chilling around Haight Asbury might delve a little deeper to create a unique image. But for your everyday 14-to-34-year-old millennial is this really how we perceive reality? As Exhibit A, “normcore” seems to promote a more androgynous look is widely accepted. Also, we can’t forget the man bun — a possible move in the feminine direction? On the other hand, growing up in a Georgia suburb, while girls openly embraced camo, men weren’t really rushing towards nail polish, kilts, or, well, anything associated with a more traditionally feminine identity. Maybe my peers were the missing third in the Intelligence Group’s survey (or they thought people weren’t defined by their gender so much, they just didn’t know where those people were).

As sorority shirts look increasingly like the-shirt-you-wore-home-this-morning (complete with frocket) and frat daddies grow ever more colorful the later you venture into football season, maybe I am being generally unfair. But I fail to see how modern millennial gender norms (or abolishment thereof) seriously rival those of the flappers, the beatniks, or the hippie movement. Men’s hair was certainly more “feminine” in the 1960s and 1970s. And androgyny hardly beats bobbed hair and a straight frock. Ms. Kott does concede, “Mostly, you’ll see millennial women dressed femininely, and millennial men dressed masculinely. But many even conventionally dressed millennials are considering the ways in which gender might be flexible.”

What do you think? Do we dress and act differently? And if we don’t dress differently, do we feel fundamentally different about gender?

Alexander McQueen’s “It” Hat: Inspiration 2014


Sarah Burton’s Spring 2014 collection for Alexander McQueen introduced something to put on your head. But what is it? Hat? Cap? Cloche? Skullcap?  Flashing down the runway in silver and gold, where did this innovation come from?


“I wanted energy without froth.” Burton claims.

I posit 3 possible inspirations.

1. Blue collar power tool industry inspiration?


This seems like the most likely option to me based on last year’s beekeeping theme. Is Burton/ McQueen quietly paying homage to  different industries, making statements about there perception while transfusing high and low cultural conceptions?


2. A modern take on a 1920s cloche? Is this update supposed to be an interpretation of a “new woman” and the more metallic streamlined look supposed to represent strength?


Burton agreed with this interpretation saying, “They’re sort of 1920s cloche hats.” While this may be true, contrasted with the tribal and militaristic influences of the collection, what started as a cloche seems like decidedly something else.

3. (my personal favorite) Tron?


Image enough said.

Have any better ideas? Let me know what you think… Feel free to add whether you would ever wear this. I’m still on the fence.

Fashion: 7

Funky: 8

Fancy: 3

Function: 2